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In the animal realm, there are a lot of instances of misidentification. A man once discovered his cute, fluffy “puppies” were Asiatic black bears and was horrified. (A mistake that is more typical than you might imagine.) Then there was the woman whose “Belgium Shepherds” were a gang of rabid jackals.

According to the Estonian news website Postimees, the most recent “imposter” is a Eurasian wolf impersonating a doggo. A team of workers building the Sindi dam discovered the poor critter frozen and stranded in a chilly river north of the vacation town of Pรคrnu in southwest Estonia.

After they carved a path through the ice, the men saved the enormous dog, covered it with a towel, and brought it to their car to warm up. They then dialed animal rescue, who advised them to transport the “dog” to a local clinic for medical assistance. They followed their instructions, believing the person needing their care was a dog or Canis lupus familiaris. They didn’t realize the creature was a wolf until they arrived at the animal sanctuary.


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One of the guys engaged, Rando Kartsepp, described the mission to Postimees, saying, “We had to carry him up the slope. He was fairly large. Kartsepp told reporters, “He was calm and slept on my legs” on the drive to the center. He briefly lifted his head as I sought to stretch them.

According to the Estonian Union for the Protection of Animals (EUPA), by the time the wolf arrived at the animal center, his blood pressure had decreased, which would have contributed to his peaceful demeanor.


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His identity was finally revealed when a local hunter revealed to the guys that they had saved a young male wolf, perhaps no older than a year. The veterinarians treated the puppy and then placed him in a cage because they were worried he wouldn’t be as calm when he woke up.

Thank goodness he quickly recovered and was released back into the wild after being fitted with a radio tracker by scientists at the national environmental agency.

“We are so happy for the story’s outcome and wish to thank all the participants,” the EUPA added.

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