Paris-based fashion photographer Vincent Flouret just unveiled a project that is particularly dear to the viewers. The “Maxdonna” initiative, which aims to reproduce Madonna’s iconic images and album covers, features his 6-year-old dog, Max. After volunteering with City Shelters in Los Angeles, Vincent started taking photos of his cat. But as time went on, their work grew, and Max rapidly acclimated to it.

Once you look over the photos, you’ll see why Max was the ideal pick for a model. The content photographer claims that his cat is his top focus. “To my Max, everything is a game. For instance, if I were to require a cap for shooting with him, I would rather get it two weeks beforehand so that he can play with it and become acclimated to it. So, during the photo shoot, it becomes something natural and enjoyable for him. As a huge Madonna lover, I used her for this project. Our endeavor would, in my opinion, be a monument to the artist.

When I have a break from my commercial work, I enjoy doing this kind of work very much. Vincent claimed that creating the project’s costumes, training, and photo shooting took him eight months. The project’s philanthropic component is its best feature. Vincent will give the proceeds from selling the prints of “Maxdonna” to Madonna’s charity Raising Malawi, which works to better the lives of orphans and vulnerable children in Malawi. 

“Hung Up” Music Video

Credits: max_et_vincent

“Like A Virgin” Album Cover





Credits: max_et_vincent

Ray Of Light Album Cover



Credits: max_et_vincent

“Music” Single Cover



Credits: max_et_vincent



“Material Girl” Music Video



Credits: max_et_vincent

“True Blue” Album Cover

Credits: max_et_vincent



“Vogue” Music Video

Credits: max_et_vincent

“Cherish” Music Video




Credits: max_et_vincent

“Desperately Seeking Susan” Movie Poster”




Credits: max_et_vincent

Harper’s Bazaar Magazine Cover




Credits: max_et_vincent

“Erotica” Music Video




Credits:max_et_vincent

Funny Dog Outfits

Every photographer has an innate desire to capture the things they find beautiful and dear to their hearts, including their cherished pets. One of the prettiest, funniest, and most colorful topics for photography is dogs; however, because of their unpredictable nature and similar to how it is when shooting young children, it can be very challenging to get wonderful dog photography photos. All types of pet photography work well with dogs as the subject. Eye-catching dog pictures can be created from their vigor, unpredictability, and excitement.


In photoshoots, portrait photographers frequently get to know their subjects. After understanding their personalities, they better understand what to avoid and how to provide directions. When photographing dogs, you can employ the same method. If your pet model has a lot of energy, you can prepare for a hectic and unpredictable picture shoot. You can bring some snacks to entice it if it likes to lounge around.


This knowledge can be used to motivate you as well. Theron Humphrey, a seasoned travel photographer, frequently draws inspiration from the peculiarities and routines of his dog.

Any living thing is affected by the proverb, “Eyes are the doorway to the soul.” To ensure that your dog’s eyes are sharp and to make their expression the main focus of the picture, auto-focus on them when framing your subject. Consider keeping an eye out for and recording that. More interesting dog images will always be those with expression and individuality in the eyes. The puppy frequently won’t start posing as soon as you grab your camera. I advise taking expressive portraits after your photo shoot. When that happens, your subject has used all its energy and is prepared to unwind.

The primary goal of dog photography is to portray the charm and character of your closest companion. You’re less likely to get this if they’re in an unusual setting, like a studio. Take your pet outside to a park or your backyard to let them unwind and relax. Thanks to this, they should appear more at ease in front of the camera. It will give you more confidence if you’re a novice pet photographer.


If you want them to stay still, use this easy trick: let them play quietly, and then, when you’re ready with the camera pointed and your finger poised to press the shutter, call your dog. When they turn to face you, press the shutter as soon as possible to get a picture of them entirely focused on you and your camera. If you can get their attention, you might be able to get a few quick pictures of them being still. A quick movement may cause them to leap up and follow you, so be careful not to do that. 

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