Rare young white reindeer nearly blends into the snowy backdrop.
In these enchanted winter images, the exceptionally uncommon white young reindeer virtually blends into the snowy scene.
The lovely pure white deer wasn’t bashful as it “posed” for photos in the highlands of Northern Norway, despite its apparent camouflage.



On a hiking excursion with companions, photographer Mads Nordsveen from Oslo, Norway, came across the almost supernatural animal.
The 24-year-old said: “This lovely tiny creature appeared out of nowhere when I was roaming in the highlands seeking attractive vistas for my trip photos.


He walked right up to me, and we exchanged face-to-face. He became pretty at ease when he realised I was calm and amiable. It appeared almost as if he were staging a photo shoot. He was amusing and very interested, like a young explorer. After a few minutes, the mother reindeer of the young deer emerged from the nearby trees.



It stood still for a while before sprinting back to its mother.
It was a fairy tale moment and very magical. Maybe we’ll cross paths again someday.
Due to a rare genetic mutation, white reindeer have pigment-free fur, enabling them to blend in with their snowy surroundings.
Since their eyes and antlers occasionally still have dark pigmentation, they do not have albinism.

Less than 1% of the deer population consists of white reindeer, also called leucitic deer. Leucitic deer do not have pink eyes and noses, a common indication of the albino trait, despite frequently being mistaken for being albinos. White reindeer do not have albinism; instead, they have a genetic mutation that results in the loss of colour in their fur.



White reindeer do not have albinism; instead, they have a genetic mutation that results in the loss of colour in their fur. The indigenous people of northern Europe are said to view white reindeer, which are uncommon, as a sign of happiness. According to photographer Mads Nordsveen, the calf approached closely and gave him direct eye contact.

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