A scupture
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The bees (except for parasitic bees) provide their young with a combination of pollen and honey. In contrast, wasps feed their young animal food or fill their nests with insects or spiders. Bees are very similar to certain species of wasps. Specific anatomical differences are associated with this difference in food flavor, the most important of which is that the wasps are covered with unbranched feathers. Simultaneously, the bees have at least a few branched or feathered hairs on which the pollen often clings. Honeycombs are produced from beeswax, a compound formed by workers’ bees.

Worker bees secrete wax scales from special glands in their bodies when the temperature is right. Then they chew the wax to produce the beeswax with a little bit of honey and pollen. The Honeycomb composition consists of a series of hexagonal cells, usually containing raw honey, formed from beeswax. It is growing to take around seven days to 2 months for bees to build their Honeycomb.

Honeybees can add 1 to 3 pounds of Honeycomb inside the device within approximately seven days of early build-up and start-up. Beeswax is the ingredient used by bees to create their Honeycomb cells. It is quite close in form to other waxes. Honeybees release beeswax to the lower abdomen from the eight openings of the glands. Honeybees, though, must eat honey to produce beeswax. As the beeswax hardens, it falls onto translucent flat sections known as scales in the bees’ belly region.

The female bees then munch these scales to make them weaker. Inside the Honeycomb, these softened scales form hexagonal cells.

Bees are the real concept artists. Their Honeycombs is an outstanding display of vision, hard effort, and careful execution. By teaming up with artist Tomas Libertiny to create the Honeycomb statue of the Ancient Egyptian Queen Nefertiti, these little insects have recently produced another example of their incredible creativity. The preparation work was carried out by Libertiny, who created a structure for a statue specifically built to direct the bees through the process. He then recruited some 60,000 hard-working bees to carry his idea to life in 2018.

The Nefertiti bust was in development when first seen at Kunsthal Rotterdam in the summer of 2019. It was set up as a live facility where visitors could see bees designed in real-time. It was not until the end of 2020 that the Rademakers Gallery bust was finished and shown in Amsterdam. Libertiny fascination with the beauty and intelligence of nature powers his work with everlasting and relatable feelings. The psychological and physical connection between Man and Nature is a constant source of inspiration. Results are still characterized on the artist’s hand, taking advantage of today’s sophisticated design methods and emerging technology to discover and understand his craftsmanship.

A scupture
tomaslibertiny

His use of industrial precision is “a means to an end” that allows him to establish controlled randomness requirements. His experience of the patterns and repetitions surrounding us, and the mesmerizing imperfections of nature are at the formal core of his drawings, paintings, and sculptural pieces.

Meet Tomas Libertiny from Studio Libertiny, a Slovak artist who currently resides and operates in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, who creates art to uncover the beauty and intellect of existence, to investigate the philosophical questions of the human soul, to discuss the bond between man and nature.

Libertiny has been concentrating on one of the most up-to-date styles over the past two years, the Queen of Egypt’s Nefertiti bust, which he called Infinity. He chose beeswax instead of following the regular route and using more traditional sculpting materials, such as clay or metal.

More specifically, as in the refined wax, it wasn’t beeswax, and that’s not all. Around Sixty thousand bees help to this creation. What you see here is an all-natural bee-making formation, with a bit of Libertiny structural guidance.

So, what happened was that he designed and developed a Nefertiti bust 3D frame that looks amazing, but then he hired a few bees to start creating a Honeycomb around it. The device was built primarily to preserve structural integrity and to streamline the Honeycomb design of the bees.

60000 Bees creating honeycomb around the 3D model

60000 Bees creating honeycomb around the 3D model
tomaslibertiny

Before the first presentation in Kunsthal Rotterdam in the summer of 2019, progress had been made. It was set up as a live facility where visitors could see bees designed in real-time. It wasn’t until the end of 2020 that the Rademakers Gallery bust was finished and shown in Amsterdam.

Libertiny said as the design boom put it, that “it is a testament to the strength and timelessness of ‘mother nature’ as well as its ancient character as a powerful woman reigning against the odds.” It is the queen’s bust, and the bees built it for their hive and their queen.

“In making such a sculpture, as Libertiny explained, there are several challenges: ‘Second, nature itself is also evolving in environmental patterns, and the boundaries of the surrounding flora must also be recognized. It also happens that the completion of beeswax sculptures requires several years. Libertiny also works directly with professional beekeepers with whom the process is changed.

Sometimes, the products are overbuilt in one location but not finished in another. As you would have done with a bonsai, Libertiny must lead the building of growth, steadily string the workflow to positions that you deem perfect. It is a lot like that.

Second, the result is also a surprise, and it is not something you can fully anticipate through traditional crafting methods such as you can. It seems that Libertiny wants to look at the finished piece for several days to appreciate it truly. Nature provides you with your interpretation of the mission. It’s humbling and fun at the same time.”

Now, while there is a whole sequence of Produced by Bees, this is only one of a handful of Libertiny’s beeswax inventions. Before this, he has produced Unbearable Lightness, a full human statue, The Honeycomb Amphora, which is just as it sounds, and several other works inspired by Honeycomb.

The Creation in Action

Other “Honeycomb” creations by Libertiny

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